Belinda Archibong

Region of Study Africa  
Primary Country of Residence United States of America  
Title Assistant Professor  
Affiliation Barnard College, Columbia University  
Email ba2207@columbia.edu  
Mailing Address Department of Economics
Barnard Hall, 239 LeFrak
3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027

https://barnard.edu/profiles/belinda-archibong  
Phone / Fax Number(s) (212) 854-8952  
Countries Of Specialization Nigeria  
Education Doctor of Philosophy in Sustainable Development, Columbia University, 2015

Master of Arts in Sustainable Development, Columbia University, October 2013

Bachelor of Arts in Economics/Philosophy, Columbia University, May 2010  
Research Interests Research on the role of geography and institutions in determining valuation of energy, infrastructure and natural resources for sustainable development.
Research examining the relationship between infrastructure access and institutions in pre-colonial Africa and its implications for contemporary African development.

Ph.D. thesis: Essays on the Impacts of Geography and Institutions on Access to Energy and Public Infrastructure Services. Columbia University, 2015.
See: https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/catalog/ac:186998  
Teaching Interests 2016-2017: “Logic and Limits of Economic Justice” ; “Theoretical Foundations of Political Economy” ; “Environmental and Natural Resource Economics”  
Publications 2017. With Francis Annan.
"The impact of disease, gender, and disability on children and households: disease and gender gaps in human capital investment:
evidence from Niger’s 1986 meningitis epidemic," American economic review: papers & proceedings. 107 (5): 530-535.

2016. "Historical origins of persistent inequality in Nigeria." December 2016. WIDER working paper; no. 161/2016.
Helsinki, Finland: United Nations University, World Institute for Development Economics Research, 2016.
https://www.wider.unu.edu/publication/historical-origins-persistent-inequality-nigeria

2015. With Vijay Modi & Shaky Sherpa
"Geography of infrastructure functionality at schools in Nigeria: evidence from spatial data analysis across local government areas,"
Papers in applied geography. 1(2): 176-183.
 
Keywords precolonial Africa, Energy, Infrastructure access, natural resources, Nigeria, spatial